new directions 2011

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about new directions 2011

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As photographers, we look for faces and expressions that tell stories. We look for character. We look for emotion.  We look for the hook, that moment of being that creates a compelling portrait. A portrait tells a story equal parts subject and photographer in a single moment.  This show is a look at a few of those moments, moments that make a person think. 

In all of the images included in the show I find unique styles and interesting compositions.  Leon Alesi’s  photograph “Mark” is a visually arresting image.  The dramatic lighting and the glowing red mug and matching drapery really make the expressionless Mark stand out.  I felt like I was having a very uncomfortable conversation with him. Russ Osterweil’s “Yoni Thinking” makes me think about perfect posture and the male figure.  While I would find this position personally uncomfortable, I would never think of asking another man to sit in such a way.  But it makes this photograph more interesting, as do the perfect tones of the black and white image.

All of these photographs convey unique and powerful moments of life. Quiet comes to mind when I look at Holly Lynton’s “The Red Coats.” The solitude of the woods.  The whisper of the falling snow.  But I suspect the making of this photograph was louder than it appears.  Kristen Fecker Peroni’s “Birthday Cake” is as pure as it gets.  The frustrated feeling of having a small child scream and pull on you at the end of a crazy day.  The honest emotion shows in her eyes. In a different way, Ash LaRose’s “Untitled” leaves much to the imagination, but you suspect that something is about to happen.  Sexual energy burns from the eyes of her red headed subject.

The images in this portrait show challenge the traditional head shot.  Many of these portraits  are edgy and daring;  I wanted to create a show that makes the viewer a little uncomfortable,  a little off center.  Nudity often makes people uncomfortable; although not completely nude, Daniel W. Coburn's “Paco” is a fine example of this.  This image of a man lying on his bed in his underwear while staring enticingly into the camera  leaves us wondering about the  moments  between the subject and the photographer.  

Like Coburn’s work, Katie Shapiro’s photograph of “Lesley” shows a trust and a relationship between the photographer and the subject.  The beauty of the shapes and textures with a clear, plain background bring the focus to the eyes of the subject, rather than directly to the naked breast.  There is a connection that is clear to the viewer

In creating their work, these photographers took chances. While many gallery shows are purely profit driven and often too safe in both content and form,  I feel I took chances in “Moments of Being” with work that pushes the boundaries of what is normally called a portrait. 

Many thanks to gallery owner Crista Dix who let me run with my idea and let me create the show I wanted to have, in her space.  I think we all took chances.


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As photographers, we look for faces and expressions that tell stories. We look for character. We look for emotion.  We look for the hook, that moment of being that creates a compelling portrait. A portrait tells a story equal parts subject and photographer in a single moment.  This show is a look at a few of those moments, moments that make a person think. 

In all of the images included in the show I find unique styles and interesting compositions.  Leon Alesi’s  photograph “Mark” is a visually arresting image.  The dramatic lighting and the glowing red mug and matching drapery really make the expressionless Mark stand out.  I felt like I was having a very uncomfortable conversation with him. Russ Osterweil’s “Yoni Thinking” makes me think about perfect posture and the male figure.  While I would find this position personally uncomfortable, I would never think of asking another man to sit in such a way.  But it makes this photograph more interesting, as do the perfect tones of the black and white image.

All of these photographs convey unique and powerful moments of life. Quiet comes to mind when I look at Holly Lynton’s “The Red Coats.” The solitude of the woods.  The whisper of the falling snow.  But I suspect the making of this photograph was louder than it appears.  Kristen Fecker Peroni’s “Birthday Cake” is as pure as it gets.  The frustrated feeling of having a small child scream and pull on you at the end of a crazy day.  The honest emotion shows in her eyes. In a different way, Ash LaRose’s “Untitled” leaves much to the imagination, but you suspect that something is about to happen.  Sexual energy burns from the eyes of her red headed subject.

The images in this portrait show challenge the traditional head shot.  Many of these portraits  are edgy and daring;  I wanted to create a show that makes the viewer a little uncomfortable,  a little off center.  Nudity often makes people uncomfortable; although not completely nude, Daniel W. Coburn's “Paco” is a fine example of this.  This image of a man lying on his bed in his underwear while staring enticingly into the camera  leaves us wondering about the  moments  between the subject and the photographer.  

Like Coburn’s work, Katie Shapiro’s photograph of “Lesley” shows a trust and a relationship between the photographer and the subject.  The beauty of the shapes and textures with a clear, plain background bring the focus to the eyes of the subject, rather than directly to the naked breast.  There is a connection that is clear to the viewer

In creating their work, these photographers took chances. While many gallery shows are purely profit driven and often too safe in both content and form,  I feel I took chances in “Moments of Being” with work that pushes the boundaries of what is normally called a portrait. 

Many thanks to gallery owner Crista Dix who let me run with my idea and let me create the show I wanted to have, in her space.  I think we all took chances.


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